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Weather and Violence

As temperatures rise, tempers flare. Anyone who has experienced the hostility of a swelteringly hot summer day in the city can attest to that.

But researchers are now quantifying the causal relationship between extreme climate and human conflict. Whether their focus is on small-scale interpersonal aggression or large-scale political instability, low-income or high-income societies, the year 10,000 B.C. or the present day, the overall conclusion is the same: episodes of extreme climate make people more violent toward one another.

Climate, Conflict and Economic Development: The Next 50 YearsUniversity of Oslo, NorwayOctober 19, 2017
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Life is a Lab Lecture: Climate and ConflictNorwegian School of Economics, Bergen, NorwayOctober 18, 2017
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TEDxBerkeley talk: Climate, Conflict, and African DevelopmentZellerbach Hall, UC BerkeleyFebruary 8, 2014
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Analysis of statistical power reconciles drought-conflict results in AfricaWorking PaperAfrican DevelopmentEnvironment and ClimateResearch Methodology2016
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Quantifying the Influence of Climate on Human ConflictPublished PaperEnvironment and ClimatePolitical Economy and ConflictResearch Methodology2013
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Temperature and violencePublished PaperEnvironment and ClimatePolitical Economy and ConflictResearch Methodology2014
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