New Article: Twenty Year Economic Impacts of Deworming

This study exploits a randomized school health intervention that provided deworming treatment to Kenyan children and utilizes longitudinal data to estimate impacts on economic outcomes up to 20 years later. The effective respondent tracking rate was 84%. Individuals who received 2 to 3 additional years of childhood deworming experience an increase of 14% in consumption expenditure, 13% in hourly earnings, 9% in non-agricultural work hours, and are 9% more likely to live in urban areas. Most effects are concentrated among males and older individuals. Given deworming's low cost, a conservative annualized social internal rate of return estimate is 37%, a very high return by any standard. (NBER Working Paper #27611)

Co-authors: Joan Hamory, Michael W. Walker, Michael Kremer, and Sarah J. Baird.

Media coverage here on Vox, NPR, BerkeleyNews.

Book: Transparent and Reproducible Social Science Research

Recently, social science has seen numerous episodes of influential research that was found to be invalid when placed under rigorous scrutiny. Transparent and Reproducible Social Science Research: How to Do Open Science is the first book to summarize and synthesize new approaches to combat false positives and non-reproducible findings in social science research, document the underlying problems in research practices, and teach a new generation of students and scholars how to overcome them. Created with both experienced and novice researchers in mind, Transparent and Reproducible Social Science Research serves as an indispensable resource for the production of high quality social science research. (Published by University of California Press in July 2019. Watch NBER Methods Lecture.)

Co-authors: Garret Christensen and Jeremy Freese.

Purchase via U.C. Press or Amazon.