Talk topics

Ted has lectured on a wide variety of topics related to his research, including the relationship between climate and violence, patterns of African economic and political development, the need for greater transparency in social science research, electrification and development, and links between health, education and productivity for the poor. He has also given public lectures on his books, Economic Gangsters and Africa's Turn? Most talks listed below are public lectures, often with slides, audio and video recordings. For a more complete list of talks (including academic seminars and conferences), refer to his CV.

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Conflict, Climate, and African Development (Oxford)
LocationOxford, UK
DateMarch 18, 2013

Ted gave the Keynote Speech at the 2013 Center for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) conference at Oxford University. He presented results from his paper Quantifying the Influence of Climate on Human Conflict, which he co-authored with Solomon Hsiang and Marshall Burke.

Understanding African Development: Trends and Prospects
LocationSan Francisco, CA, USA
DateMarch 9, 2013

The 2013 Pacific Conference on Development Economics (PacDev) was presented by the Bay Area Development Association and held at San Francisco State University. During the 2013 PacDev plenary session entitled Understanding African Development: Trends and Prospects, Ted Miguel and Bob Bates discussed the emerging economies of Africa in their talks.

UC Berkeley Homecoming Faculty Seminar
LocationBerkeley, CA, USA
DateOctober 5, 2012

Africa is besieged with drought, war and famine, yet since 2000 it has also experienced monumental economic growth after decades of decline. Paved roads, electricity, and other infrastructure have improved, malls and Internet cafes are sprouting up, and cell phones have become ubiquitous, indicating a substantial rise in disposable income. What is behind the rebound? Will it last? Ted explores one of the world’s most intriguing economic trends in one of UC Berkeley’s 2012 Homecoming Faculty Seminars.

(Credits: UC Berkeley faculty seminar brochure) 

Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Preanalysis Plan (Stanford)
LocationPalo Alto, CA, USA
DateMay 18, 2012

The Global Crossroads Conference is held annually at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. It focuses on a topical phenomenon that has world-wide relevance. Starting with a foundation of academic research presented by thought leaders on the topic, the conference expands to engage business and political figures in a dynamic conversation. 

The theme for the 2012 Global Crossroads Conference was “Radical Political Transitions: Causes and Consequences”. Ted presented results from his paper Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Preanalysis Plan, which he co-authored with Katherine Casey and Rachel Glennerster.

(Credits: Stanford Center for Global Business and the Economy) 

Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Pre-analysis Plan (UC Berkeley)
LocationBerkeley, CA, USA
DateApril 27, 2012

The Center for Effective Global Action's 2012 Evidence to Action symposium, “The Road from Conflict to Recovery”, brought together academics and policymakers to discuss strategies for promoting recovery in fragile states and conflict-affected communities. In particular, Ted and Katherine Casey discussed the challenges of community driven development in post-war settings.  They presented results from their GoBifo study in Sierra Leone, an intensive program to promote democratic decision-making within villages, in which they found no impact on social norms (i.e. involvement of marginalized groups in community decision making).  They also discussed their use of the pre-analysis plan and the importance of having a registry for social science research to record such plans.

(Credits: CEGA website) 

Distinguished Teaching Award Ceremony
LocationBerkeley, CA, USA
DateApril 26, 2012

The Distinguished Teaching Award, instituted in 1959, is given annually by the Committee on Teaching, a standing committee of the Berkeley division of the Academic Senate. UC Berkeley’s most prestigious award for teaching is intended to encourage and recognize individual excellence in teaching. Such teaching rises above good teaching: it incites intellectual curiosity in students, engages them thoroughly in the enterprise of learning, and has a life-long impact. While acknowledging the fact that the Berkeley faculty comprises many outstanding teachers, the Committee on Teaching is extremely selective in determining the recipients of this award

Ted was one of five recipients of the 2012 Distinguished Teaching Award. He received this honor at the Distinguished Teaching Award Ceremony in UC Berkeley’s Zellerbach Playhouse. A video of recipient profiles is here.

(Credits: UC Berkeley News, UC Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning)

Understanding the Emerging Economies of Africa: Trends & Geopolitical Implications
LocationSan Francisco, CA, USA
DateFebruary 29, 2012

The World Affairs Council of Northern California hosted Ted for a lunchtime talk on how to understand the emerging economies of Africa. Ted examines Africa today and tackle tough questions such as:

(1) How are the economies in Africa doing in 2012 and which countries are in the rising tide of south-south trade 
(2) What geo-political effects will the rise of south-south cooperation have on the global economic landscape?

An audio recording of this talk is available from the World Affairs Council website.

(Credits: CEGA Website)

Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on External Aid and Local Collective Action
LocationSt. Louis, MO, USA
DateJune 9, 2011

The Econometric Society’s 2011 North American Summer Meeting was held at Washington University in St. Louis. During the development economics plenary session, Ted presented the results of his paper Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Pre-analysis Plan, which he co-authored with Katherine Casey and Rachel Glennerster. 

Education as Liberation?
LocationBerkeley, CA, USA
DateApril 28, 2011

The Center for Effective Global Action's 2011 Evidence to Action symposium, “The Returns to Investment in Girls,” presented findings of several recent studies, each focused on early investments in girls that can lead to increased income generation and decision-making power in adulthood.  It also generated dialogue between researchers, policy makers, and donors to identify a learning agenda for the broader international development community. Ted and co-author Rebecca Thorton contributed to this dialogue by presenting the results of their paper Education as Liberation? (Other co-authors: Willa Friedman and Michael Kremer)

(Credits: CEGA website)

Civil War and Economic Development
LocationBoston, MA, USA
DateJune 6, 2009

The Econometric Society’s 2009 North American Summer Meeting was held at Boston University. During the development economics plenary session, Ted presented on civil war and economic development.